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Core Value: Boundless Gospel

Core Value: Boundless Gospel

03.14.17 | About

    Our values are simply how our beliefs about God, the world, and one another are lived out. Our values enable us to order our time, talent, resources, and passions in a way that glorifies God and blesses people. Here at Park Cities, we hold to five main core values. This post is all about one: Boundless Gospel.

    What does it mean?

    God’s love for his people is unstoppable. The Gospel is at the center of all we do. It moves beyond our boundaries, conventions, and expectations to redeem and restore what sin has broken. It cannot be contained or watered down. It is a gift of grace that rescues and changes us, directing our motivation and our love towards God and the task of building His Kingdom.

    What does it look like in real life?

    The Gospel of Christ is distinctly unique from our cultural values in that it shatters the barriers of convention that lift up the powerful and marginalize the weak. The Gospel proclaims good news of salvation, and with it, a new, revolutionary reality for all kinds of people . . . and particularly for those on the fringes of society: the forgotten, the shunned, the disabled, the hungry, the poor, the sick, and the powerless.

    In America, some of the most powerless populations of people are behind prison bars.

    When he was growing up, Alfonzo Hill was told he would never amount to anything. And he believed it.

    I never had anybody, including my parents, tell me that they loved me, he said. I come from a dysfunctional family. I was told I would never amount to anything, but today I’m 56 years old and I have good self-esteem. I have a relationship with my family, my ex-wife, my kids, and my grandkids.

    Alfonzo’s transformation didn’t come without suffering. He spent a decade behind bars for drug-related offenses, and was released on parole about a year and a half ago. Unable to find a job because of his conviction and about to hit bottom again, his parole officer and a local minister referred him to a job skills workshop at PCBC that was conducted by the Marketplace Ministry of Movement Day Greater Dallas.

    That’s where Alfonzo met Art Alexander, a PCBC deacon and member of the Marketplace Ministry team. Art became Alfonzo’s mentor, helped him get a driver’s license and find a job at a landscaping company. They talk daily. They spend time together. Alfonzo has met Art’s family and has been invited into their home. A dentist friend of Art’s donated some necessary dental work. Alfonzo even had the chance to take his son to a Dallas Cowboys game.

    About 600 prisoners come out of prison and into our community every month, Art said. They don’t have much more than the shirt on their back. God has blessed me with opportunities I’ve had in my job, and I want to pass that along to those who need some help rebuilding their lives. But the most important change for Alfonzo had nothing to do with me. He became a Christian while he was in prison.

    The Gospel does the incredible work of rescuing us and ushering us into a new family, but it also rescues us to something: to work alongside God as he redeems and restores what sin has broken in the world. The Gospel doesn’t just change our status—it changes everything. Beyond a job and new skills, Alfonzo feels loved . . . something he has never experienced before in his life.

     “When Art told me he loved me, I thought something was wrong. I thought I was just a number. I didn’t know that this existed.”

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